2018

Cascading Respiratory Issues

A ten-year-old boy presents with asthma, allergies, eosinophilic esophagitis, reflux, and night snoring. His mother is concerned with his heavy dose of Prevacid over the last few years. He had latch/throat issues at birth; as an infant he contracted respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

On evaluation his diaphragmatic fascia was restricted. His neck and throat were especially tight. He had dental crowding in both jaws.

His case brings up a timeline of many specialties:

1. A CFT recommendation from the OB/GYN to the future mother before pregnancy may have made a difference in his health. As a clinical observation in our Lancaster research, many mothers had better pregnancies, easier deliveries, and healthier babies after therapy.

2. If the NEONATOLOGIST had checked his compromised Baby Brain Score (BBS) at minutes old, the neonate would have had extensive CFT during his first day of life. The BBS generally red flags a tight impaired body. While no one could have predicted any of his future issues at that time, the Gillespie Approach may have been a game changer for him.

3. Then the PEDIATRICIAN would probably not have dealt with his RSV, asthma, and allergies because his stuck fascial diaphragm and respiratory system would have opened quickly at birth. Our clinical research showed release of fasical tension promoted a healthy immune system to clear disease-causing pathogens.

4. The ENT may not have dealt with his eosinophilic esophagitis. The fascial web connects every structural cell in the body. Just below the epithelium is the superficial layer of fascia. If birth trauma causes chronic strain in the throat, a chronic inflammatory redness of the esophageal lining may be a reaction to this tight underlying fascia.

5. The ORTHODONTIST probably would not have to now deal with narrow dental arches, malocclusion, and a breathing/airway condition. Please check Dr. Barry Raphael’s website, alignmine.com, detailing airway orthodontics.

6. If left untreated, the PULMONOLOGIST would possibly be diagnosing sleep apnea and recommending a CPAP later in life.

7. As a last resort, a SURGEON may someday need to correct the airway.

This case boils down to when health care professionals first recognize a potential problem and when they start to correct it. My focus is on the first two options.

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