2018

A Toddler’s Earaches

I recently saw a 13-month-old with eight weeks of constant earaches. After she had been on four different antibiotics without success, her doctor recommended ear tubes.

She had been very healthy until she hit her forehead on the corner of a piece of furniture. The earaches started soon thereafter, and her mother came to me for help.

She presented with a zero-second brain cycle and tight neck fascia. The rest of her body felt clear. In the Gillespie Approach the scalene fascia along the sides of her neck was straining directly into her ears, apparently causing the problem. She exhibited the typical post-therapy red fascial blotching on her neck, and her brain cycle opened to 70 seconds.

My expectation is that as the strain fully releases in the next few visits, the earaches will fade away. My medical explanation is that the antibiotics were probably not effective because the root of the problem was structural, not bacterial.

Even though our Lancaster research babies were not old enough to have chronic earaches, they had similar mucous-forming conditions like indigestion/gas/constipation. Those infants, who did not respond completely to our structural work, almost always had a problem with dairy products. Ironically, most of their moms owned working dairy farms. This is another instance of we do not tell people what to do. But for those breastfeeding moms who gave up dairy completely, their babies recovered nicely.

Our goal is for this approach to be incorporated into the current pediatric system. Your child’s cycle would be measured at every pediatric visit creating a personal baseline. It would give the provider a good indication of how well the craniosacral fascial system and associated structures are functioning. If you take your child to the ER after a traumatic injury, a provider would check the brain cycle and offer appropriate care.

This approach needs to make headway in hospitals directly at birth. Parents will then want it for their growing children, and pediatricians will be more open to follow the lead of their hospital colleagues. I believe a well-functioning nervous system will significantly improve pediatric physical/mental health and raise the bar for education.

 

Tags
Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

Close
Close